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Sebastian

Toyota Carina TA20 | Gatebil Rudskogen

“Everyone says Toyota is the best company in the world, but the customer doesn’t care about the world. They care if we are the best in town, or not. That’s what I want to be.” Akio Toyoda
Mr. Toyoda-san was proven right in 1979 when a customer decided to buy the best car in town. He or she could have chosen something entirely else, but for some reason or another this plain white 2-door Toyota Carina TA20 got picked.

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

In the late 70’s and early 80’s nobody thought about leasing or buying a car for just a few years and getting rid of it as soon as the warranty period ends. Purchasing a new car was a long-term decision. Unfortunately the ugly monster called rust often killed this generation of vehicles prematurely. Mechanically they rarely (if ever) failed.

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Only a few pristine cars are left now. This one is a prime example and has obviously been well cared for in the last 30+ years. So if you think about Carina being an old lady you are trusted to care for – what would you do? Buy her some make-up and jewellery?

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

No, because a natural beauty doesn’t need that and it would only distract from her charm. Rather buy her a set of new shoes in a classic design and lower the center of gravity so she can safely get to all the destinations. Well done Kenneth Groth!

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The classic wheel design and not too much lowering is all she needs. The gracefully aged lines are not only complemented perfectly but at the same time very nicely accentuated.

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The Toyota Celica TA22 parked next to the elegant old lady has been treated similarly, but with a much sportier approach. Chin and trunk spoilers complement the period-correct wheels and the fender-mounted mirrors complete the athletic look. What a beautiful pair – both of which don’t scream “look at me” but rather invite you to silently enjoy the fine chrome details. Imagine the stories these ladies would tell if they could speak.

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Toyota Carina TA20 | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Since Kenneth trusted somebody else with taking care of her about a year ago, I can only hope she is still doing well.

1932 Ford 5-window hot rod Angeles City Philippines | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2017)

1932 Ford Hot Rod in Angeles City

“The marvels of daily life are exciting. No movie director can arrange the unexpected that you find in the street.” Robert Doisneau

Unexpected finds put the biggest smiles on my face. Much as the Beetles in Bangkok, this sparkling red 1932 Ford 5-window hot rod suddenly appeared on the side of the road in Angeles City, Philippines. The for sale sign in the windshield told us to call Steve, but unfortunately there was no time to further investigate the details of this classic vehicle. It’s up to you to guess the engine and transmission specs and whether this is a steel or plastic body. All I can tell you from the brief glance is that it is in mint condition. Enjoy the pictures!

1932 Ford 5-window hot rod Angeles City Philippines | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2017)

1932 Ford 5-window hot rod Angeles City Philippines | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2017)

1932 Ford 5-window hot rod Angeles City Philippines | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2017)

1932 Ford 5-window hot rod Angeles City Philippines | drive-by snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2017)

 

Volkswagen | Beetles in Bangkok

“Let it be, let it be. There will come an answer, let it be.” The Beatles

thailandEight hours layover between flights at BKK, recovering from a sea kayak accident and barely being able to walk I asked myself what to do with the time? Sitting idle at the airport wasn’t really a choice and while dragging my suitcase around the lively airport, I stumbled accross a sign pointing to the Airport Rail Link that ends in downtown Bangkok. Sitting in a train means not having to walk and so I bought a one-way ticket. At the downtown terminal I found myself looking at a rather large intersection. Hmm…

Weird car at large intersection downtown Bangkok | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

As the Beatles predicted in their wisdom decades ago I just let it be… and there was an answer – in form of a very friendly man from northern Thailand who stopped his Tuktuk at the curb. He wanted to know where I was headed and my honest answer was that I had absolutely no clue.

“You want to see temples? Or girls?” 😉

Well, temples would be allright, but no red light district tour please. I’d rather just drive around to see as much of the city life as possible. Oh, and it would be awesome if there would be some classic cars to take pictures of. I guess he knew right then that this wasn’t goint to be a regular tourist tour. Showing him some pictures and telling him about the Drive-by Snapshots blog certainly helped. In between the tourist attractions we found some amazing places for petrol heads that surely no self-respecting tourist guide book would ever mention.  More on these in the following posts later this week. This post is dedicated to a chance we almost missed while rushing along at roughly 50 km/h in the afternoon traffic.

Bangkok Tuktuk 2016 | Drive-by Snapshot by Sebastan Motsch (2016)

Lightning quick reflexes of my driver ensured that we could hop onto the sidewalk with the Tuktuk when I yelled “Stop please, I spotted something”.
I walked back a couple of meters to make sure my peripheral vision didn’t fool me. Can you spot anything in the window next to the parked scooter?

Downtown Bangkok 2016 | Drive-by Snapshot by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

Oh yes! Despite sweat running into my eyes and being a little dehydrated by now, the skills honed by one and a half decades of finding and taking drive-by snapshots hadn’t failed me. And indeed, there wasn’t only a familiar nose behind the glass of the shop window, but also a set of very recognisable Fuchs alloy wheels. In the background you can see the Tuktuk parked on the sidewalk.

Volkswagen Beetles in Bangkok | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

That really was a stunning find in the middle of Bangkok: two early Volkswagen Beetle – both of them very tastefully modified. While cupping my hands and trying to peek inside I noticed a young boy inside, sweeping the floor. A gentle knocked on the window caused him to look up – and run away instantly. Well this didn’t go as planned. Taking pictures into a dimly lit room from a street drenched in bright sunlight doesn’t really help picture quality, or does it?

Volkswagen Beetle in Bangkok | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

Remember the quote above? There will be an answer, let it be. So we let it be and turned around to leave, when the boys mom asked something in Thai.
My driver kindly acted as an interpreter and translated my wish to take pictures of the two air-cooled gems. She was excited and super friendly, opened the door and invited us inside.

Volkswagen Beetle in Bangkok | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

Upon closer inspection it became evident that these early Beetles have been built to a very high standard and finished perfectly.

Volkswagen Beetle in Bangkok | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

I love the style and all the little details. This is almost exactly as I would spec a Volkswagen Käfer if I had one.

Volkswagen Beetle in Bangkok | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

But there was more than just looks and style. Judging by exhaust diameters, both cars had engines that seemed to be massaged in some way or another.

Volkswagen Beetle in Bangkok | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

One question remains: why are two classic Volkswagen parked in an otherwise empty shop? The friendly lady explained that it’s going to be a shop selling clothes, apparently automotive themed. The owner wants to use his weekend toys as decoration. Now this is something that gets a firm nod of approval and respect. Well done, sir!

dbs-volkswagen-beetles-in-bangkok-09

Immediately after leaving this lovely micro-museum and even now in retrospect the whole episode seems rather unreal. Did this really happen? In the middle of a busy city next to a busy street?

Keep your eyes open and one thing always in mind: smiles open doors – not only in the country of smiles. 🙂

 

 

 

Citroen HY 1964 Carrosserie Le Bastard | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Citroën HY S.E.V. Marchal | Carrosserie Le Bastard 1964

Flag FranceIn the 1960’s the internet wasn’t invented yet and only a few people had a black and white TV. Apart from advertising in newspapers and cinemas, companies had to come up with different ideas to get the attention of potential customers. In France, many companies ordered special re-bodied vehicles from coach builders to gain attention at events like the Tour de France and the 24 Heures du Mans. These vehicles drove along the circuit before the races began. Concerning the Tour de France, the tradition lives on even today, but unfortunately most vehicles are not purpose-built solely for advertising duty any more.

Citroen HY 1964 Carrosserie Le Bastard | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

In 1964 the French company S.E.V. Marchal, who manufactured many automotive products, commissioned a re-bodied version of the Citroën HY to serve as a promotional vehicle and a showcase for their range of products. Therefore, it was equipped with many lights and horns from the portfolio. The front of the vehicle is impressive and you might wander what kind of generator they used to power all these lamps?

Citroen HY 1964 Carrosserie Le Bastard | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The sides of the vehicle have been converted to display cases with assymetrical windows and the rear features various stoplights and taillights. It seems fair to say that it lacks a bit when compared to that front-end. Note that most panels of the van are made from flat sheet metal instead of the signiture ribbed metal that makes the HY so easy to identify. The flat panels really change the overall appearance of the HY and makes it look a lot more modern.

Citroen HY 1964 Carrosserie Le Bastard | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Just for fun, I tried to imagine what it might look like when all the lights are on. Impressive, n’est pas?

Citroen HY 1964 Carrosserie Le Bastard | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Dodge WC-51 Wrecker with Peugeot 404 Cab Conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

Dodge WC-51 Wrecker with Peugeot 404 Cabin Conversion

“We have had a very severe frost and deep snow this month.
My thermometer was one day fourteen degrees and a half
below the freezing point, within doors.”
Gilbert White

Flag FranceUtilizing surplus WWII machinery with canvas tops for towing wrecked cars in the winter at high altitudes with plenty of snow has certain disadvantages. The canvas covers freeze and eventually break when you move them. Scraping the ice of the plastic windows sratches them permanently and you never get warm and comfortable inside the vehicle, even with the heater on at full blast. To solve these problems and to make his live easier, Monsieur Negre could have bought new tow trucks. But hey! This would have been too easy. Men capable of creative thinking get pencil and paper out instead of the checkbook. Why should you throw away perfectly good vehicles just for the sake of being more comfortable?

It shouldn’t come as a surprise that a man who runs a garage and a towing business comes up with the idea of using car bodies for the task at hand. Form follows function, right? Unfortunately the results of this motto often look rather… hmm… questionable.

Fortunately this is not the case here. The man who built the Renault 4 bodied Willys MB Jeep featured here previously certainly has an eye for proportions and a set of great fabrication skills. It takes more than just welding a car body onto an existing chassis if you want to avoid driving around in what clearly looks like a botched job. Selecting the right base vehicle is the crucial first step. Monsieur Negre got both proportions and look right on the vehicles he designed and built. The Willys R4 looks like it could have been ordered like that from the factory.

Dodge WC-51 Wrecker with Peugeot 404 Cab Conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

The Dodge WC-52 Wrecker with the Peugeot 404 cabin certainly has a strong presence. Blending the narrow bonnet with the considerably wider cab takes artistic skills and the result reminds me of the Berliet GBH trucks. Stunning.

Dodge WC-51 Wrecker with Peugeot 404 Cab Conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

According to David Negre, son of the builder and now running the family business, the engine starts at the first crank with a new battery. We didn’t try it when shooting these pictures last week, but there is no obvious reason to doubt that claim.

Dodge WC-51 Wrecker with Peugeot 404 Cab Conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

The rather luxurious Peugeot door panels contrast nicely with the military-spec dashboard. This truly is a purpose-built machine with style.

Dodge WC-51 Wrecker with Peugeot 404 Cab Conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

The business end of the truck is original and features the same lovely patina than the other parts of the body. The winch apparently still works, but giving it some freash grease before trying sure wouldn’t hurt.

Dodge WC-51 Wrecker with Peugeot 404 Cab Conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

The license plate indicates that the vehicle has been registered 1963 or later.

Dodge WC-51 Wrecker with Peugeot 404 Cab Conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

I never noticed before, but removing the headlights from a Citroën 2CV instantly gives it a “cleaned” custom car look. This vehicle actually appeared in the background of the first story about the Willys Renault 4 conversion from 2010.

 

Willys MB Jeep with Renault R4 body conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

Revisited | Willys MB Jeep with Renault R4 body conversion

Flag FranceSix years ago I discovered a Willys MB Jeep with a Renault 4 body conversion and took some pictures.
Two and a half years ago I started to write this blog and decided to kick it off with the story about the converted Jeep.
A week ago, on a roadtrip home from Malaga, we spontaneously decided to cross the Massif Central instead of driving through the Rhône valley.

While driving through the Gorge du Tarn from Millau, memories kept popping up inside my head. Thoughts about my then-girlfriend, the surfing holidays we came back from, the chambre d’hôte in Millau we stayed at and the car we were traveling with: my 1989 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.3. Good old times.

This time around, I was traveling with a good friend in a 1988 Toyota LandCruiser HJ61. The ride was a lot more agricultural compared to the W201 and because of that, I suddenly remembered shooting pictures of the R4-bodied Willys somewhere between Saint Enimie and Le Puy. This instantly sparked my desire to look if the Jeep was still there. And guess what Рwe arrived at the gas station in Ch̢teauneuf-de-Randon and the field next to it was empty. But hey Рasking is free and I never give up just like that.

Willys MB Jeep with Renault R4 body conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

David, the owner of the gas station and Renault dealership Sarl NEGRE is a very friendly fellow and told us that his dad built the little truck decades ago. My guess on the conversion wasn’t too far off back then. It was actually never used by the local fire brigade but did years of reliable duty towing cars in the area. Davids father added the Renault 4 body to keep warm and dry in winter. If you look closely, the old livery is still visible. Gotta love the patina!

Willys MB Jeep with Renault R4 body conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

It surely must be rather quiet in an area with two-digit telephone numbers. This could possibly be the reason why the blue Renault 5 in the background only shows 6.000 km on the odometer! Seems like it didn’t get driven around much.

Willys MB Jeep with Renault R4 body conversion | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

Living in a quiet area does have some advantages, though. It’s amazing that the car has not been vandalized in the decades it has lived outside.

If you look closely the old livery is still visible. Gotta love the patina!

I really hope it will still be there when I visit the next time – whenever that is going to be. Until then: rust in peace.

If you look closely the old livery is still visible. Gotta love the patina!

PS: David kindly showed me the other truck his father build. And let me tell you one thing: it is equally genius and even more impressive. Come back soon to read about it in the Drive-by Snapshots post. Meanwhile, enjoy reading how Guido Kehder (Die Leitplanke) built a 1:24 scale model of this vehicle.

[Edit: Here is the new link to the above mentioned article.]

Sunset Snapshot on wet road 03 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Chance and coincidence

“The world is so unpredictable. Things happen suddenly, unexpectedly. We want to feel we are in control of our own existence. In some ways we are, in some ways we’re not. We are ruled by the forces of chance and coincidence.” Paul Auster
Flag GermanyFellow photographer Marco Spalluto (spallutography) and I once discussed the influence of the various factors when taking photographs. Spotting the opportunity, composing the picture, getting all the settings on your camera right and pressing the button at the right time. All of them are essential, but to get everything anywhere close to what you think is perfect takes a lot of time. However, many awesome moments are exactly what the name suggests: moments in time. Capturing a moment in bright daylight is more often than not measured in thousands of a second shutter speed.
What if that special moment only lasts a few seconds and the only equipment available is a smartphone? Try anyway!
After driving in heavy rain for almost two hours today, I spotted a hole in the clouds that appeared to be big enough to get a glimpse of the sunset. Driving on a westbound road in the rain might just yield the opportunity to see the sunset with some interesting reflections.
The first picture admittedly isn’t good. While the composing might be allright and ticking a couple of boxes, the result is rather boring.

Sunset Snapshot on wet road 01 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

OK. Let’s add an overpass and some mist from the vehicles traveling on the Autobahn on top to spice it up with some drama. And once again, the picture does not deliver because now the sun is just a white blob and most of the color wasted due to overexposure. Now this really is disappointing! But…

Sunset Snapshot on wet road 02 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

… following the road through a left-hander after the overpass suddenly changed everything:

An explosion of colors! I especially love the contrast between the speed displayed by the proximity to the guardrail and the almost static rain drops on the windshield. The powerline pole is a welcome addition and I am surprised by the detail available in full resolution. The reflection on the road surface is exactly what I had envisioned. Does that make me a happy photographer? Yes.

Sunset Snapshot on wet road 03 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Mind you – the pictures have been taken with the standard camera settings of a Samsung Galaxy Alpha smartphone (while riding shotgun in a friends car).

Mr. Auster was right: sometimes things just happen and there is nothing (or not much) we can do to influence the outcome. I’m happy with the picture because it shows that millisecond that made an otherwise not-so-memorable journey on a rainy day a great one. 🙂

Sunrise in Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

The rising sun reveals pure JDM goodness in Oman

Flag Oman“The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time.” John Lennon

We all agree that anything is better than spending twelve hours between flights at a boring airport, don’t we? In order to enjoy it and make the most of the time I had to waste anyways, I spontaneously bought a five day visa, went outside and rented a car. Nothing fancy to write home about – just a plain and dull Chevrolet Malibu. But hey – the A/C worked and the seats are way more comfortable than the benches in the transit area of the airport. OK then, let’s go! No GPS, no map, no plan. This is the way I love to start an adventure!

Sultan Quaboos Street takes you from the airport to Muscat and is brightly lit at night. Cruising at a leisurely pace on an empty four-lane highway with soothing electronic music playing from a local radio station, the city lights and the full moon shining is like meditation. I kept on driving until I eventually hit the end at the Al Bustaan Palace roundabout. Last year in January we looked at the dhow in front of the Majlis Oman parliament building in bright daylight. Now, the full moon added a special vibe.

Majlis Oman Roundabaut with ship | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

From there I took the scenic route along the coast to see what the Sultans’ Palace looks like at night, but was disappointed. Its bright colors certainly look better in daylight. Driving around Mutrah and Ruwi for a while I eventually started to feel tired. In any other country I would have made an effort to find a safe place to sleep for a couple of hours. But this being Oman, I just parked my car somewhere and dozed off for a couple of hours… until the Muezzin from the nearby mosque woke me at the faintest hint of daylight. Rising early ensured that I made it to Al Khuwair North in time for sunrise.

Sunrise in Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

As soon as the sun was up, people appeared. Some of them walking their dogs, others jogging along the beach. On virtually every flat surface along Street 37, groups of Indians set up makeshift cricket fields. What a nice way to start the day! Don’t be fooled by the empty parking spaces in the picture below as most of them parked directly on the beach.

Sunrise in Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

Being thirsty I started looking for a convenience store or gas station to buy some supplies. But again – this is Oman and one gets distracted easily because of all the awesome cars parked in front of the houses. In this case, pure JDM goodness: a pair of hawk-eye Subaru Impreza WRX STI.

Subaru Impreza WRX STI Hawkeye Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

The early morning sun provided extra smooth light and it was a real joy to take these pictures in this location with a beautiful background, setting and light.

Subaru Impreza WRX STI Hawkeye Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

This might be a pair of weekend toys, because they also had two late-model WRX STI. Looks like I forgot to take pictures of those.

Subaru Impreza WRX STI Hawkeye Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

Given the choice I would prefer the silver STI without the wing, even though I like the massive wings on these WRC performance machines.

Subaru Impreza WRX STI Hawkeye Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

The low sun accentuated the lines of the fenders perfectly.

Subaru Impreza WRX STI Hawkeye Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

Across the street, the neighbors also enjoy the Japanese way of drive. A rather subtle Lexus IS300…

Lexus IS300 Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

… and a not-so-subtle Mazda 2 on a set of Volk Rays TE37. #needsmorelow

Mazda 2 Muscat Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2016)

This was only the beginning of an automotive treasure hunt. There is more to come soon!

1955 Simca Hot Rod Concrete Mixer | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2007)

Nondescript French Concrete Mixer Hot Rod

Flag FranceTodays post is something for classic car fans who love challenges. I found this French hot rod with a mock-up concrete mixer on the back in rural France back in 2007. Ever since then, I’ve been wondering what the hell this is actually based on.

1955 Simca Hot Rod Concrete Mixer | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2007)

The for sale sign in the windshield says 1955 Simca 9, but I wasn’t able to find a picture that even remotely matches the hood and doors. Maybe the sign refers to the chassis? The other vehicles give an indication for the size of the little trucklet.

1955 Simca Hot Rod Concrete Mixer | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2007)

If you have any idea, please let me know and I’ll update this post subsequently.

PS: Did you notice the 2CV tail light upgrade on the Citroën HY panel van?

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Volvo P1800 | Schloss Freudenhain Passau

Flag Germany“You recently posted a picture of a beige car on Facebook. I don’t know what kind of car it is, but the picture is so beautiful that I looked at it more than once.”

This quote is from a friend who isn’t really interested in cars – but has a professionally trained eye and lots of practical experience with equilibrated color combinations. When we met a couple of days after posting the preview shot on Facebook, she told me that she loves how perfect the color and style of the car correspond with the background. The way she spoke about her impressions of the picture catapulted me back to that very hot day in 2014 when I portrayed Stefans’ Volvo. Daniela, this article is dedicated to you for putting my previously unspoken feelings about these photos into words. Thank you.

3rd Passau Classic Car Day, July 6th 2014.
The thermometer already exceeded 30 °C at 09:20 am, when Stefan drove his 1963 Volvo P1800 to the event location: Schloss Freudenhain in Passau.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Mitsch (2014)

Little did he know that by the end of the day his vehicle would be the star of a photo shooting on the other side of the fence. Nor did I – but seeing the P1800 drive by in front of Schloss Freudenhains’ cream colored walls in the morning sun instantly sparked my desire to portray the vehicle right there. Sometimes you only need a split second to identify a perfect match.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Mitsch (2014)

Looking at the reflection in the chromed P1800 S hubcap you can see that the courtyard is empty. After a hot day, filled with conversations about the beautiful classic cars, participants and visitors had left the venue. Before heading to a Biergarten ourselves, we used the afternoon sun to make the most of what seemed to be the natural habitat for this beauty.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Stefan purchased the Volvo from a dealer in Munich in February 2014. The chassis number 4561 indicates that it is one of the ~6000 early models produced in the UK by Jensen. Production was eventually moved to Sweden late in 1963, apparently due to bad build quality. Vehicles made in Sweden are called P1800 S. For a few months, P1800 S models still featured the characteristic cow horn front bumpers of the Jensen-built models.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Stefan says his P1800 was originally delivered to the USA and first registered in July 1963. After decades of cruising the highways in the USA, it was eventually sold and shipped to Germany in 2007.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Mitsch (2014)

The body has apparently never been welded and is in excellent condition.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Mitsch (2014)

The vehicles 90 hp B18 engine is standard with the overdrive being a factory option. Later P1800 S models featured standard overdrive and more horsepower (96 hp).

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Mitsch (2014)

A few parts on Stefans car are not original, such as the door boards at the time of the shooting. However, he recently purchased and fitted a set of OE parts.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Mitsch (2014)

Not too long after the photo shooting, Stefan also replaced the skinny original wheels with wider items and lower profile tires. These wheels are period-correct, because they have been available as a factory option.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The chrome trim is in mint condition and beautifully reflect the matching colors of Schloss Freudenhain.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The owner loves driving the P1800 as often as possible and enjoys the fine details of its design.

1963 Volvo P1800 at Schloss Freudenhain Passau | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

I want to say a big thank you for the letting me photograph your classic car and for all the information you provided for this article. Have a safe drive and enjoy it!

Station Service Saint Priest de Gimel France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2009))

Station Service abandonné in St. Priest-de-Gimel

Flag FranceDriving past this abandoned service station in 2007 sparked a memory. A long time ago, when I was a young boy, we used to take the same route between Clermand-Ferrand and Bordeaux. If I remember correctly, this station was still in service back then and we might even have stopped there to fill up.

Station Service Saint Priest de Gimel France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2007)

The paint might be faded, the pumps gone and the light poles rusty – but it sure has kept this special character only old petrol stations have. I just love the old-school architecture. Does a functional building have to be boring or ugly? No, sir! Back then, they thought about details and didn’t just build as quick and cheap as possible like today. The design is similar to the Station du Haut-Limousin I featured not too long ago.

Station Service Saint Priest de Gimel France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2007)

The most prominent and accentuating feature of the building is the semicircular office area, which features fully glassed walls. Three matching semicircular steps lead to the central entrance door. Beauty is in the details, in my opinion. Did you note that the rectangular workshop area has symmetric windows left and right of the door? And even though it doesn’t look like in the pictures, the roof covering the pumps is symmetrical to the very same center line of the workshop door.

Station Service Saint Priest de Gimel France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2007)

The building next door looks like it was also home to a workshop once. For many years, the white Peugeot 204 Break was parked between the building, in front of the owners’ house.

Station Service Saint Priest de Gimel France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2007)

Every time I drove through St. Priest-de-Gimel and past the service station I dreamed about buying this awesome place (in the middle of nowhere) one day. All I could hope was that nobody would buy it until I could afford to purchase it.

Station Service Saint Priest de Gimel France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2009))

Two years later in June 2009, roadworks necessitated the removal of the light poles and pump roof. Somehow it looks naked without the roof in front of it, doesn’t it? And hey, where did the trusty Peugeot end up? I looked into the windows, but couldn’t spot it inside.

Station Service Saint Priest de Gimel France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2009))

The house also looked abandoned. The old man might have passed away. God bless him for holding onto the property long after closing for good. Shedding a little tear, I noticed the for sale signs in the windows of the office. Being a student at the time and having no money to spare made me sad.

Station Service Saint Priest de Gimel France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2009))

Upon returning once again in September 2009, we found the road finished and the garage door partially open. The house was still boarded up and the for sale signs still in the windows. Albeit finished with my studies I still wasn’t in a position to buy the property – but dreaming about it still didn’t cost anything…

Station Service Saint Priest de Gimel France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2009))

If you point your browser to google maps and search for St. Priest-de-Gimel you can still find this little gem. The google picture has a 2011 copyright and the workshop next door has been restored and converted. The good old times are gone forever on that side of the property. Let’s hope the little petrol station gets spared and sees a brighter future!

Peugeot 504 Pick-up Strasbourg France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Peugeot 504 Pick-up with more patina than rust

Flag FranceWhenever I take a road less traveled, there seems to be something interesting hiding behind a tree just around the corner. En route to the Parc de l’Orangerie in Strasbourg with my girlfriend, we found a somewhat sad looking Peugeot 504 Pick-up.

Peugeot 504 Pick-up Strasbourg France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Mind you, this is not somewhere in a rural area, but only a Kilometer or so from the European Parliament.

Peugeot 504 Pick-up Strasbourg France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

The warm afternoon light painted a nice shine on the neglected body and made it seem like it was parked only weeks ago.

Peugeot 504 Pick-up Strasbourg France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Upon closer inspection, sitting there abandoned for months seemed more realistic. But nonetheless, the condition it was in suggested that it could still be saved by a caring soul.

Peugeot 504 Pick-up Strasbourg France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

With more patina than structural rust or other damage and in what seemed to be original paint, this isn’t unfeasible at all.

Peugeot 504 Pick-up Strasbourg France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

The paper note stuck to the windscreen wiper proves that I wasn’t the first to have the idea. Oh well… I sure hope it will find a new home soon.

Peugeot 504 Pick-up Strasbourg France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Whoever is going to rescue this little workhorse – please save the little details that make these utility vehicles so authentic! Good luck!

Peugeot 504 Pick-up Strasbourg France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

 

Station Service Le Rousset France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2010)

Station Service Le Rousset / France

Flag FranceWhen was the last time you found something not only totally unexpected, but also thought to be extinct by now? Trundling along the Route Départementale D27 at a leisurely pace on a hot day with no cloud in sight, we had a moment just like that, when we found the cutest rural petrol station and workshop. The icing on the cake most definitely was the color-matched Renault R5, which made the scene even more unreal.

Station Service Le Rousset France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2010)

The TOTAL pumps have been updated at a certain point, but everything else was like “back in the old days”. The little office, the workshop and the old lady filling the cars. Mind you, this is no self-service station! You pull up to the pumps, which are located right at the curb, and the old lady eventually emerges from the house on the other side of the road. To experience this kind of time travel is nothing short of amazing and well worth the extra time. The mighty W201 still had more than half of a tank to go, but I wanted to stop and buy fuel there in order to #supportlocalbusiness.

Station Service Le Rousset France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2010)

The choice of payment methods was quite old-school as well: cash only. And as I was fumbling to get those Francs… err… Euros out of my wallet, I suddenly realize that people back then had more of something that is often scarce nowadays: time. Time to drive slow. Time to chat with the fuel pump attendant about the weather and which Boulanger makes the best Baguette. Lovely idea, no?

Station Service Le Rousset France | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2010)

Now, five years later while writing this article, I was wondering if the cute little petrol station is still in business. Well… you can find it on google Streetview, but the images have been also captured in 2010. I guess I need to take the time to go there again and take a look…

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Toyota Corolla E100 Kakimoto Racing, Muscat, Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Kakimoto Racing Toyota Corolla E100

Flag OmanWhile wandering about near the Sultans’ Palace in Muscat, Oman, we spotted something we didn’t expect at all in this part of the world. Now who would ever look twice at an E100 series Toyota Corolla? Yeah, right. Nobody would. But because this particular vehicle wasn’t painted white and sitting there sporting not only a mild stance but also a perfectly fitting exhaust tip, we casually took a second look. This really is a nice, understated daily driver that could paint a smile or even a big grin on your face while commuting to work.

Toyota Corolla E100 Kakimoto Racing, Muscat, Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

No body kit, no wing, no flashy alloy wheels. The owner just kept it simple and accentuated the clean lines of his Corolla which, in my book, makes it even better and a perfect sleeper. Unfortunately the owner wasn’t around to answer any questions. Therefore we could only guess what might be hiding under the bonnet.

Toyota Corolla E100 Kakimoto Racing, Muscat, Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

My friend Florian, who has worked for RECARO in Japan for a number of years, recognized the Kakimoto Racing sticker on the windscreen and told me that it is a well-known tuning shop in Japan. So far so good… but how odd are the chances to see a Kakimoto Racing equipped LHD(!) Corolla in the capital of Oman? This proves time and again, that you have to look behind the scenes. There might always be a little gem hiding in an alley somewhere.

PS: The bonnet is not misaligned. An Omani gentleman told us, that it is adjusted with spacers to make cooling the engine bay easier on hot days.

Toyota Corolla E100 Kakimoto Racing, Muscat, Oman | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Wonder-Forest Cadillac Gatebil Rudskogen 2014 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

A new WUNDER-BAUM® scent coming soon | #BecauseGatebil

Flag NorwayThe WUNDER-BAUM® was invented in 1952 and has been produced in huge quantities ever since. Under normal circumstances, the tree-shaped air-freshener is a lonely fellow. He prefers to lead a solitary life, enjoying the panoramic view from its natural habitat – the rear-view mirror.

However, some of the little trees are members of a secret organization. They gather once a year to hold their annual meeting, called WUNDER-FOREST®. In 2014, they attended the Gatebil festival in Rudskogen, Norway. If you looked closely, you might have noticed that the trees held small-group workshops in various vehicles around the track, dangling from the rear-view mirrors of various cars.

We caught a few of them in Erlend Skulstads’ Audi 100 Avant

Audi 100 Avant C3 Norway 2014 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

… and we even had the chance to catch a glimpse of their annual general meeting, held on neutral terrain in a totally in-suspicious looking Cadillac from Sweden.

Wonder-Forest Cadillac Gatebil Rudskogen 2014 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Gotta have some room to breathe in such meetings, don’t you agree? 😉

Wonder-Forest Cadillac Gatebil Rudskogen 2014 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Eavesdropping on the conversation revealed, that the Gatebil Festival inspired them to create a new scent for future WUNDER-BAUM® applications…

Wonder-Forest Cadillac Gatebil Rudskogen 2014 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Why? #BecauseGatebil

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Citroën 2CV | Chopped Duck Sweet & Sour

Flag GermanyA hot summer day in 2014. Heading towards the Nürburgring for the annual Oldtimer Grand Prix, we decided to stop at a rest area to buy refreshments. The petrol station was filled to the brim with travelers, their (mostly humdrum) cars, and a couple of trucks for good measure. But there is always a nugget to be found somewhere, if you just look hard enough. Actually, we didn’t really have to look hard, because the nugget occupied one of the prime spots. The owner and his friend just wanted to leave, but happily stopped and agreed to answer some questions and let me take a few pictures. Thank you, guys!

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

So what do we have here? It’s a Citroën 2CV with plenty of modifications. Most visible and hard to miss: the top has been chopped. In order to keep the original windscreen, the angle of the A-pillar has been adjusted. If I remember correctly, it also had something to do with being able to make the car road legal (TÃœV approved).

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The rear has been treated to one of those parts that look cheesy on a normal 2CV. But on this car, it somehow looks as it was purposely designed for it.

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

I always loved the design of these aftermarket 2CV wheels – but widened like that makes them pop even more! Great choice!

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Up front, the widened fenders look awesome. In conjunction with the chopped top and the lowered ride height, this 2CV looks a lot angrier than the rather cute stock version.

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The ventilation scoop in the fender is not just there for looks. It helps with extracting the heat of the tuned four cylinder, air-cooled Citroën GS boxer engine.

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The engine itself was finished nicely and featured plenty of brilliant solutions, most of which I unfortunately don’t remember now, more than half a year later.

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

But one thing I do remember is the fantastic sound. You just can’t beat a carburetor with an open air filter!

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Inside, all the vital functions can be monitored. The guys told me that the ignition switch broke during their holiday. But hey, if this happens to you with a modern car, you’re in for a costly repair in a foreign country with all chances of being ripped off, because you have no choice. Older cars are better in this regard – just hot-wire it and drive home 🙂

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Alfa Romeo seats help with driving long-distance in such a vehicle, because they are way more supportive than the stock seats.

Citroen 2CV Chopped Duck | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

In case you’ve been wondering about the title of this post: the 2CV is nicknamed “Ente” (duck) in German.

Nissan Patrol Shumaisa Beach | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Nissan Patrol 160 | Catch of the day

Flag OmanBefore reading this story, please make sure to read the story called Fishermen’s Friends.

Most seafood restaurants have catch of the day on their menu: a special fish out of the many fish caught last night, served fresh. Drive-by Snapshots is not a seafood restaurant but a blog covering automotive topics – and the menu changes daily.

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Oman Road Trip | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2015)

Fishermen’s Friends

Flag OmanImagine you’re driving along a brand new and perfectly fine highway which, without prior warning, abruptly ends at a beach. Mind you, the beach was not the intended destination!

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Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 23-16 Vorserie | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Barn find | Mercedes-Benz W201 2.3-16 Vorserie (pre-series)

Flag GermanyWhich old car enthusiast has never dreamed of a barn find? How would it be to open the gate to an old garage and finding something long forgotten? Just imagine seeing the dust of decades dancing in the early morning light and inhaling the dry air.

Well the days of finding a classic car by chance are over, because most garages and barns have been treasure hunted already and are empty now. Today treasure hunting is more of a virtual game, as we are trying to find beautiful bargains that only had one caring owner, super low mileage and a full service history with all the dealer stamps in the right places. On top of that, a folder containing all the invoices is more than welcome and considered the icing on the cake.

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

However, while looking for such cars you sometimes stumble upon advertisements containing information that doesn’t really make sense.

This happened to a friend of mine, who found a well used (and abused) 1984 Mercedes-Benz 190E with 184hp advertised as a “donor car”. The vehicle looked like a half-decent tuning attempt from the late 1980’s: lowered, then-cool SEC look grille, lots of fake wood inside and full set of 16V aero parts.

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

So far, so good. But wait a minute… what? Mercedes-Benz 190E from 04/1984 and 184hp? This is impossible, because the 16V could be ordered only half a year later at Mercedes-Benz dealerships. Therefore, it must have been a conversion and was considered to be interesting as a part donor for the own 190E 2.3-16. It never hurts to have a few spare parts stacked away, does it?

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

After a not-so-enlightening phone call to the owner and figuring out it was only a 15 km drive, the trailer was hooked-up immediately and the GPS fed with the address. Most readers might be able to relate to this kind of spontaneous thinking. 😉

The seller was an elderly gentleman, who had just purchased a brand-new SLK. He was very friendly and inquired, what the young man may want to do with this old piece of junk car?
“I have a car exactly like this one and want to have some spare parts for it.”
The seller wanted to know if he also had a Diesel?
“Err… no. It’s an early 2.3-16, very similar to this one.”
Shaking his head, the elderly gentleman asked whether it also had a transmission that you have to shift the wrong way around and left Roland speechless as he turned away to open the hood…

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

… which of course helped to conceal a major grin, when he not only found  the correct engine and transmission, but also a VIN featuring this combination of letters and numbers: WDB201034. In addition to that, the papers of the car do not have a Allgemeine Betriebserlaubnis (ABE), which proves that it really is a pre-series vehicle.

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Without any further bargaining, the vehicle was bought “as seen without any warranty”. The deal was sealed with a handshake and the car immediately loaded onto the trailer. Back home, the research began…

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

A 2.3-16 specialist confirmed, that there have been 40 pre-production (Vorserie) cars: three for Nardò, 20 for the Nürburgring and 17 for press, promotion, pictures and exhibitions. The vehicle pictured here is likely one of the 17, with engine number seven.

With the information gathered so far, the W201 16V Club e.V. was contacted. They confirmed, that it is not only one of the pre-production cars, but number 26 produced as ordered by 292 (Deutschland, Sonderbedarfsfahrzeuge) and delivered on April 27th 1984. Therefore it is possible that it might be the Geneva exhibition car. Unfortunately, Mercedes-Benz didn’t confirm the numbers until now. Let’s hope the history will be clarified soon.

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The car doesn’t have the usual corrosion, but suffered damage to the body from an accident on the left front and right rear. There are a few rusty spot where the body gave way to the forces of the accident, but the axles, brake lines and other body panels are rust free.Unfortunately there is no information about the accident whatsoever. The elderly gentleman never knew what gem he had in his hands and wasn’t interested in the history of the car at all.

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The interior is not in the best shape either, but with the help of a good upholstery shop, it is possible to bring it back to the old glory. However, the car is complete and features all the 2.3-16 specific bits and pieces. The fake wood should be removed however…

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

To wrap this post up: the car is up for sale, but will only be sold to somebody who is going to restore it. Parts raiders need not apply! If you are interested, you can find more pictures and the contact data over here at mobile.de.

Bonus pictures

The car features period-correct Pioneer TS-1615 speakers…

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

… and a sticker of roughly the same vintage. The origin and meaning of the sticker is uncertain, as of now.

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

The car seems to have fond memories of a certain event 30 years ago 😉

Mercedes-Benz W201 190E 2.3-16 Vorserienmodell | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2014)

Reduce Speed Now Scotland | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

Reduce Speed Now

Flag ScotlandIn order to be able to reduce the speed, as ordered by the Scottish road sign in the opening picture, you have to gain momentum beforehand. To do so, we hopped in uncle Brians’ Hyundai Terracan, took the WRC special stage like road from Kilchrenan to Taynuilt (slowly) and then headed towards Oban.

Practice makes perfect and the locals have plenty of experience in reducing their speed. If you practice hard enough, you might one day be able to reduce your speed to zero exactly like the gentleman who precisely stopped his beautiful red Alfa Romeo 159 in front of The Wee Gallery in Oban.

Alfa Romeo 159 in front of the Wee Gallery Oban Scotland | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

After a slow ferry ride to Craignure (Isle of Mull), we soon discovered that the traffic there is already quite slow and reducing the speed further means stopping. However, if you’re not in a hurry but want to go everywhere, you could get yourself an Argo 8×8. Park it next to one of the main roads of the island and the passing Drive-by Snapshots photographer has a huge smile on his face, if the sun happens to peak through the low clouds in the perfect moment 🙂

Argo 8x8 Isle of Mull Scotland | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

The island is not only beautiful and slow paced, but seemingly also quite tranquil and peaceful. Upon arriving at the Iona Island ferry car park, we found a Ford Transit with the keys dangling on the door. When we came back later, both keys and vehicle where still there. Now… I dare you to try that in London, hehe.

Ford Transit Isle of Mull Scotland | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

Heading to Tobermory, we found a classic red telephone booth – and the reason why they still exist. There was little to no cellphone reception in the area. Reduce your mobile communication needs now, hehe.

Hyundai Terracan with classic red phone booth | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

When arriving in Tobermory, we looked for the Tobermory Cat, but only found the Tobermory Caddy.

Tobermory Isle of Mull Scotland | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

Who could resist a serving of fresh fish & chips for lunch?

Fish and Chips Tobermory Scotland | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)Wanting to buy a portion each, we reduced our speed even further…

Tobermory Taxi Scotland | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

… and almost broke the local law. It seems like you have to reduce your speed, but it must not drop to zero in some places. Not complying with that rule may end like that: no speed for an extended period of time.

Ship wrecks Isle of Mull | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

However, you may want to put the engine back into your ship ride, start it up and enjoy those awesome, twisty country roads Scotland has to offer.

Junk engine | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

What an awesome country with friendly people, a relaxing pace and interesting weather and activities. Interesting activities? Yes, sir! How about the World Stone Skimming Championships on Easdale Island? Never heard of that before either, but will definitely go there (time permitting).

Land Rover Defender 90 | Drive-by Snapshots by Sebastian Motsch (2013)

PS: Can you spot the two elks in the above picture?